How to Protect Your Notary Supplies



How to Protect Your Notary Supplies and Prevent Breaches of Privacy

Taking steps to safeguard your Notary supplies will protect you and your clients from fraud. Here are four areas to keep in mind when responsible for Notary supplies.

1. Don’t Leave Your Journal or Seal Unattended

As a general rule of thumb, you shouldn’t ever leave your work supplies unattended. The same rule applies when you are a Notary Public. Monitor your things closely and never leave your journal or seal out in the open or in your vehicle, where they are vulnerable. Some nefarious people will take advantage of the situation and steal your Notary supplies.

2. Secure Your Notary Supplies

When you are not using your Notary supplies, it’s best to keep them secure. Know your specific state laws on how to seal and secure your tools when they are not in use. While some states do not specify how Notary supplies are to be stored, it’s better to get into the habit of properly storing your equipment when you are not using them to keep it safely guarded.

3. Follow State Rules For Storing or Destroying Old Journals and Seals

Different states have different guidelines and regulations for storing and destroying old Notary supplies. California, for example, requires Notaries to completely destroy their seal when their commission’s up. However, if your state does not provide specific guidelines for disposal, we recommend destroying and disposing of your seal when your commission ends, but keeping your old journals for some time in case an old notarization becomes the subject of court dispute, or you want to recall a piece of information for your references.

4. What to Do If You Lose Your Notary Journal

If your journal or seal was stolen, you must send a letter to the Secretary of State, detailing how you lost your supplies with the inclusion, if possible, of a police report. Include your full name, your signature, and your Notary Public commission number. If you lost your materials, include the time frame of your journal entries and the expiration date of your Notary commission. (SOS.Ca.gov)


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